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“Alien Girl” is no less creepier today as she was the first time we saw her.

Depending whether we take this design as a costume or a gender/sex flip, she’s also eligible for treatment with either Female Armor Bingo or @wackd​‘s Bad Genderbend Bingo (mentioned on BABD last year) – and of course that’s while ignoring what female xenomorphs* actually look like in the movies. 

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~Ozzie

That disturbing moment when even horror movie monsters that were designed to be a “nightmare vision of sex and death” need to be sexualized.

-Icy

h/t @ronaaz​ for reminding us of this atrocity 

*For the love of everything holy and good, do not google for “female xenomorph” images if mother/queen alien is what you’re looking for.


edit: Bad Genderbend Bingo  was @wackd​‘s graphic design, but its writing is credited to @inbarfink​, @zarekthelordofthefries​, @maxwellelvis​, and @fairytalesandimaginings

avatar-dacia:

dreamersollux:

xylophil:

welcome to video game!!!!!! customize your character; but first, choose your gender:

in case anyone thought this was an exaggeration

TERA is such a bad joke of a game.  And not only that, but female characters all wear super-skimpy outfits and lean way the hell over so that you can see their panties when they run.

I mean, nothing against fanservice (although I prefer mine a bit more equal-opportunity).  This game, however, is just…tawdry.  Like something out of a particularly bad adult manhwa.

Also, I remember a discussion in which the scummy fanboys broke out literally every scummy fanboy derailing tactic in the book (plus a Godwin or two and an accusation of “shaming” the characters).  So…there’s also the matter of the brand of fan it attracts.

@eschergirls, @bikiniarmorbattledamage

Ah, TERA Online. Once upon a time, I played (and enjoyed) the closed Beta, up to the point where I had to interact with a female NPC who literally wore a metal bikini (not chainmail, actual solid metal) whose breasts still swayed–with the armor.

I actually have a mixed attitude toward the designs in the game. On the one hand, it’s all very Male Gaze, creepy, and completely impractical or physically impossible to wear into battle. On the other hand, some of their stuff is actually well-designed (i.e. actually makes use of design principles) and is nice to look at. It’s the kind of stuff I wouldn’t mind seeing at a Haute couture fashion show (though they can’t seem to design shoes for shit).

image

[full pic]

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[full pic]

And this swanky mofo, who’s wearing the male version of the above dress (imagine going to a party in these coordinated outfits, hot damn):

image

[full pic]

But the game isn’t Project Runway: TERA, unfortunately.

-Icy

I love how not only is @xylophil’s satire spot-on,  but also that @dreamersollux easily found an official game promo pic of exactly what it’s making fun of. 

Fits perfectly with all the other examples of suspicious dimorphism and its parodies we had on BABD so far.

~Ozzie

avatar-dacia:

dreamersollux:

xylophil:

welcome to video game!!!!!! customize your character; but first, choose your gender:

in case anyone thought this was an exaggeration

TERA is such a bad joke of a game.  And not only that, but female characters all wear super-skimpy outfits and lean way the hell over so that you can see their panties when they run.

I mean, nothing against fanservice (although I prefer mine a bit more equal-opportunity).  This game, however, is just…tawdry.  Like something out of a particularly bad adult manhwa.

Also, I remember a discussion in which the scummy fanboys broke out literally every scummy fanboy derailing tactic in the book (plus a Godwin or two and an accusation of “shaming” the characters).  So…there’s also the matter of the brand of fan it attracts.

@eschergirls, @bikiniarmorbattledamage

Ah, TERA Online. Once upon a time, I played (and enjoyed) the closed Beta, up to the point where I had to interact with a female NPC who literally wore a metal bikini (not chainmail, actual solid metal) whose breasts still swayed–with the armor.

I actually have a mixed attitude toward the designs in the game. On the one hand, it’s all very Male Gaze, creepy, and completely impractical or physically impossible to wear into battle. On the other hand, some of their stuff is actually well-designed (i.e. actually makes use of design principles) and is nice to look at. It’s the kind of stuff I wouldn’t mind seeing at a Haute couture fashion show (though they can’t seem to design shoes for shit).

image

[full pic]

image

[full pic]

And this swanky mofo, who’s wearing the male version of the above dress (imagine going to a party in these coordinated outfits, hot damn):

image

[full pic]

But the game isn’t Project Runway: TERA, unfortunately.

-Icy

I love how not only is @xylophil’s satire spot-on,  but also that @dreamersollux easily found an official game promo pic of exactly what it’s making fun of. 

Fits perfectly with all the other examples of suspicious dimorphism and its parodies we had on BABD so far.

~Ozzie

things that don’t break white male gamer’s immersion: dragons, magic, made up metals, impossibly large weapons, eating 50 potatoes while in combat, riding a horse up a 90 degree cliff

things that break white male gamer’s immersion: realistic armor for women, black people

~~~

The recent dudebro meltdown over new Star Wars game having female protagonist called for this Throwback. It’s additionally important since apparently someone even took issue with the character’s perceived ethnicity.
~Ozzie

When there’s a cultural “normal” in media, seeing anything that diverges from it becomes too obvious (for better or worse). That’s why questioning that “normal” is so important.
-Icy

things that don’t break white male gamer’s immersion: dragons, magic, made up metals, impossibly large weapons, eating 50 potatoes while in combat, riding a horse up a 90 degree cliff

things that break white male gamer’s immersion: realistic armor for women, black people

~~~

The recent dudebro meltdown over new Star Wars game having female protagonist called for this Throwback. It’s additionally important since apparently someone even took issue with the character’s perceived ethnicity.
~Ozzie

When there’s a cultural “normal” in media, seeing anything that diverges from it becomes too obvious (for better or worse). That’s why questioning that “normal” is so important.
-Icy